News
 International
   Global Views
   Asia-Pacific
   America
   Europe
   Middle East & Africa
 National
 Embassy News
 Arts & Living
 Business
 Travel & Hotel
 Medical Tourism New
 Taekwondo
 Media
 Letters to Editor
 Photo Gallery
 News Media Link
 TV Schedule Link
 News English
 Life
 Hospitals & Clinics
 Flea Market
 Moving & Packaging
 Religious Service
 Korean Classes
 Korean Weather
 Housing
 Real Estate
 Home Stay
 Room Mate
 Job
 English Teaching
 Translation/Writing
 Job Offered/Wanted
 Business
 Hotel Lounge
 Foreign Exchanges
 Korean Stock
 Business Center
 PR & Ads
 Entertainment
 Arts & Performances
 Restaurants & Bars
 Tour & Travel
 Shopping Guide
 Community
 Foreign Missions
 Community Groups
 PenPal/Friendship
 Volunteers
 Foreign Workers
 Useful Services
 ST Banner Exchange
  Global Views
World Goes on High Alert over Killer Food Scandal
Melamine-tainted milk has made 53,000 Chinese children ill and killed four, prompting more than a dozen countries to slap import bans on Chinese dairy products.

The United Nations has urged concerted action to remove melamine from the food chain as China's toxic milk scandal deepened, with global foodmakers rushing to check products and reassure customers.

"Food safety is not the sole responsibility of public authorities," UN health and food agencies said. "The food industry is also responsible for ensuring a safe supply of food to the consumer."

Melamine-tainted milk has made 53,000 Chinese children ill and killed four, prompting more than a dozen countries to slap import bans on Chinese dairy products.

"Restoring consumer confidence is critical," said Ezz Al Deen Boutrif of the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation. "Melamine-contaminated products should be removed from the food chain in order to prevent further exposure," he said. He urged countries to recall and destroy products "based on an assessment of the risk to human health."

The Hong Kong government said it has found traces of melamine in Chinese-made crackers and Heinz baby cereal. "We have to think about any processed food with milk or protein in it," said James Rice, a food industry veteran who is China country manager for Tyson Foods Inc, the world's largest meat processor. (Agencies)




 

back

 

 

 

The Seoul Times Shinheungro 25-gil 2-6 Yongsan-gu, Seoul, Korea 04337 (ZC)
Office: 82-10-6606-6188 Email:seoultimes@gmail.com
Copyrights 2000 The Seoul Times Company  ST Banner Exchange